13 percent increase in productivity

Nora Akins

Stanford’s Graduate School of Business’ five-year study of nearly 24,000 workers and almost 2,000 bosses resulted in 6 million measurements to determine the impact of management on productivity. Each worker averaged four managers a year to determine the outcomes from a good manager contrasted with a poor manager. The findings revealed a 13 percent increase in productivity when replacing a poor manager with a good manager.

Being a good manager is complex, requiring several skillsets and perhaps most of all is self-awareness. According to a recent Gallup poll, 75 percent of respondents reported experiencing abusive behavior at work sometime in their career; of people who quit their jobs, at least 50 percent quit because of their bosses; and 70 percent of variability in employee engagement is a result of their managers.

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